Google+ The World 2 Come: Living Forever?

Monday, December 06, 2004

Living Forever?

"Life expectancy is increasing in the developed world. But Cambridge University geneticist Aubrey de Grey believes it will soon extend dramatically to 1,000. Here, he explains why."

Dr Aubrey de Grey says:
"Ageing is a physical phenomenon happening to our bodies, so at some point in the future, as medicine becomes more and more powerful, we will inevitably be able to address ageing just as effectively as we address many diseases today.

I claim that we are close to that point because of the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) project to prevent and cure ageing.

It is not just an idea: it's a very detailed plan to repair all the types of molecular and cellular damage that happen to us over time."
Link
Source: BBC News
[via Geek News Central]

The Prophet of Immortality
"Controversial theorist Aubrey de Grey insists that we are within reach of an engineered cure for aging. Are you prepared to live forever?"
Link
Source: Popular Science
[via AlwaysOn]

Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever
"Immortality is within our grasp . . .In Fantastic Voyage, high-tech visionary Ray Kurzweil teams up with life-extension expert Terry Grossman, M.D., to consider the awesome benefits to human health and longevity promised by the leading edge of medical science--and what you can do today to take full advantage of these startling advances. Citing extensive research findings that sound as radical as the most speculative science fiction, Kurzweil and Grossman offer a program designed to slow aging and disease processes to such a degree that you should be in good health and good spirits when the more extreme life-extending and life-enhancing technologies--now in development--become available. This bridge to the future will enable those who dare to make the journey from this century to the next . . . and beyond."
Link

Audio:
The Long Now Foundation: library

See also:
Transhumanism - Wikipedia
Immortality Institute
KurzweilAI.net
Fundamental limitations on 21st century biotechnology

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